Nail Tech Career Specialties
← Back to All Posts

Nail Tech Career Specialties

Posted on: June 10th, 2020

Nail technology is a career that’s often overlooked. In fact, although many people don’t have as big an interest in nail technology as in similar beauty careers like cosmetology and barbering, nail technology can be a great opportunity for many individuals. However, because there aren’t as many people interested in nail technology, there also isn’t as much information available about it. Here are a few of the specialties you might be able to enter after you complete a nail technology program.

Manicurist

Fingernails are typically people’s most prominent nails, which means many individuals spend a lot of money to keep them looking incredible. As a manicurist, you’ll make sure people’s nails look and feel amazing. A manicure typically includes nail cleaning, cuticle and skin cleaning, and some form of nail polish, all of which you need to be able to do perfectly every time. If you’re good at mastering a similar set of steps you can use with every job, becoming a manicurist may be a great option.

Nail Artist

What if intricate nail designs are what really intrigue you? If this is the case, nail art may be your ideal career path. Nail artists can do everything from over-the-top statement pieces to understated and intricate designs, and they often have to use their creativity to come up with inventive ways to do so. They also do many other tasks to take care of nails, like cleaning and maintaining someone’s nail hygiene. If you have a love of creativity and you’re great at making someone’s desires come to life, you might want to consider pursuing a career in nail art.

Podiatrist Office Assistant

Podiatry is an interesting career choice for nail technologists. Although you may need medical training to become a podiatrist, you may not need medical expertise to work as an in-house assistant for certain podiatry concerns. For example, you might be able to help regular customers with specialty issues they can’t get help with in a typical nail salon. If you’re more interested in the medical side of things, especially if you already have some medical training, you may want to pursue this option.

Massage and Caretaking

Nail technology often includes some measure of esthetics as part of its training. After all, you have to know how to take care of the skin around a person’s nails, not just know how to manage the nails themselves. Massages may be part of this caretaking routine. For example, some nail salons offer paraffin wax massages, which require you to learn more about massage techniques, maintaining cleanliness with the wax, and other concepts. If you like being able to pamper your clients, this might be a great opportunity.

Nail Tech Instructor

Once you have some experience in your nail technology niche, you might want to pass that knowledge on to your students. Maybe you’ll learn about something you wish your instructors would have taught you in school. Maybe you work in a cutting-edge salon and you want to bring that information to upcoming students. Maybe you just love passing on information. No matter what drives you to become a nail tech instructor, instruction is definitely a viable option for people who already hold a nail technology license.

Conclusion

Clearly, there are many different opportunities for people who go through a nail technology program. Although it may seem like there are fewer opportunities in nail technology than for related programs like cosmetology and esthetics, that’s typically only because you know less about it. If one of these careers has caught your eye, why not start today?

Tricoci University of Beauty Culture offers two nail schools in Indiana that can meet your nail school needs. You can attend nail school at Indianapolis NE or Lafayette, depending on which one is closest to you and meets your needs most effectively. Talk to a team member to learn more about how you can apply today.

Tags: , ,